15 Wildflowers to Add to Your Summer Garden

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Summer is the perfect time to add some wildflowers to your garden. Not only are they beautiful, but they also provide a variety of benefits. From attracting pollinators to providing food for wildlife, there are plenty of reasons to add these flowers to your landscape. In this article, we will discuss fifteen different wildflowers that you should consider planting in your garden this summer.

How to Start a Wildflower Garden

If you are unsure of how to get started, here are a few tips:

-Start with native plants. They are already adapted to your area and will be easier to care for.

-Create a plan. map out where you want each plant to go before you start planting. This will help you stay organized and avoid overcrowding.

-Leave some space for weeds. Wildflowers are adaptable and can handle a little competition from weeds. In fact, leaving some space for them can actually benefit your garden in the long run.

Now that we have covered some basics, let's take a look at fifteen wildflowers that would make a great addition to your summer garden.

1. Purple Coneflower

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The Purple Coneflower is a beautiful flower that blooms in the summer. It is native to North America and grows best in full sun. This flower attracts bees, butterflies, and other pollinators. It is also a great choice for those who are looking to attract wildlife to their garden.

Purple Coneflowers are easy to grow and require little maintenance. They are tolerant of drought and poor soil conditions. You can find these flowers in a variety of colors, including pink, white, and purple.

If you are looking for a wildflower that is sure to add color to your garden, the Purple Coneflower is a great choice.

2. Zinnia

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Zinnias are annual flowers that bloom in the summer. They are native to North America and Mexico. Zinnias come in a wide range of colors, including white, yellow, pink, orange, and red.

These flowers are easy to grow and require little maintenance. They do best in full sun and well-drained soil. Zinnias are drought tolerant and can even tolerate poor soil conditions.

3. Shasta Daisies

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This flower is a classic that's been around for generations. They have a cheery appearance and are very easy to grow. The flowers are white with yellow centers and the plant can reach up to three feet tall. They bloom in early summer and will continue blooming all season if you deadhead them. Shasta daisies are great for cutting and make lovely bouquets. You can also let them naturalize in your garden and they'll self-seed so you'll have them coming back year after year.

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4. Marigold

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The Marigold is a beautiful flower that blooms in the summer. It has a yellow or orange color and grows to be about 12 inches tall. The Marigold is a great flower to plant in your garden because it attracts bees and butterflies.

Marigolds are also known for their ability to repel pests, making them a great addition to any garden.

5. Blanket Flower

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Gaillardia pinnatifada, the blanket flower, is a species of flowering plant in the sunflower family. It is native to western North America from Alaska to California and east to Montana. It grows in dry open habitats such as prairies, fields, and hillsides.

The plant produces yellow flowers with red or brown centers. The flowers are up to 15 cm (0.59 in) wide. The plant blooms from June to August.

If you're looking for a beautiful and easy-to-grow wildflower for your summer garden, look no further than the blanket flower! This cheerful little bloomer will brighten up any space and add a splash of color to your landscape. With its showy flowers and drought-tolerant nature, the blanket flower is a great choice for gardeners of all levels of experience.

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6. Sunflower

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The sunflower is a beautiful flower that has a long stem and large yellow petals. The sunflower is a native to North America and grows in the wild in many parts of the United States.

Sunflowers are easy to grow and make a great addition to any garden. They are drought tolerant and can grow in poor soil. Sunflowers need full sun and will do best in well-drained soil.

If you are looking for a flower that is easy to grow and care for, then the sunflower is the perfect choice for you!

7. Black-Eyed Susan

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With its striking yellow and brown petals, the Black-Eyed Susan is a common sight in fields and gardens. It blooms from June to August and can reach up to two feet tall.

The Black-Eyed Susan is a native North American wildflower that attracts bees, birds, and butterflies. It is easy to grow and does not require much maintenance.

If you are looking for a colorful addition to your summer garden, the Black-Eyed Susan is a great choice!

8. Morning Glories

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The Morning Glory is a twining vine that can reach up to 15 feet in length. The blooms are trumpet-shaped and come in a variety of colors including pink, purple, blue, and white. The flowers open in the morning and close in the afternoon.

Morning glories are easy to grow from seed and will quickly cover an unsightly fence or trellis. They prefer full sun but will tolerate some shade. Morning glories are not particular about soil type but they do need well-drained soil.

Plant morning glory seeds directly in the garden after all danger of frost has passed. Cover the seeds lightly with soil and keep moist until they germinate which should occur within two weeks.

9. Lance Leaf Coreopsis

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This North American wildflower is commonly known as tickseed and grows in a variety of colors including yellow, orange, and red. It blooms from May to September and prefers full sun.

Lance leaf coreopsis gets its name from its long, lance-shaped leaves that are arranged in pairs along the stem. The flower heads are made up of many small ray flowers that surround a central disk flower.

The plant grows 12-18 inches tall and does best in well-drained soil. It's a good choice for butterfly gardens and cutting gardens.

Seedlings should be started indoors six to eight weeks before the last frost date. Transplant seedlings into the garden after all danger of frost has passed. Plants can also be direct-seeded into the garden in late spring.

10. Cosmos

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This is a widely-known annual flower that blooms in a variety of colors including white, pink, purple, and red. It's native to Mexico but has naturalized throughout the United States.

Cosmos flowers have a daisy-like appearance and grow on long stems. They bloom from summer to fall and prefer full sun.

The plant grows 24-36 inches tall and does best in well-drained soil. It's a good choice for cutting gardens and butterfly gardens.

Seedlings should be started indoors four to six weeks before the last frost date. Transplant seedlings into the garden after all danger of frost has passed. Plants can also be direct-seeded into the garden in early spring or late summer.

11. Aster

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This wildflower is native to North America and blooms in a variety of colors including white, pink, purple, and blue. It blooms from August to October and prefers full sun to partial shade.

Asters have daisy-like flowers with long ray petals surrounding a central disk. The plant grows 18-36 inches tall and does best in well-drained soil.

It's a good choice for cutting gardens, butterfly gardens, and naturalized areas.

Seedlings should be started indoors six to eight weeks before the last frost date. Transplant seedlings into the garden after all danger of frost has passed. Plants can also be direct-seeded into the garden in late spring or early summer.

12. Wild Blue Flax

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This North American wildflower is also known as linseed and blooms in shades of blue and purple. It blooms from May to August and prefers full sun.

Wild blue flax has long, slender leaves that are arranged in pairs along the stem. The flowers are small and delicate with six petals arranged in a spiral pattern.

The plant grows 18-24 inches tall and does best in well-drained soil. It's a good choice for naturalized areas, rock gardens, and butterfly gardens.

Seedlings should be started indoors four to six weeks before the last frost date. Transplant seedlings into the garden after all danger of frost has passed. Plants can also be direct-seeded into the garden in early spring.

13. Candytuft

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This annual wildflower is native to Europe but has naturalized throughout North America. It blooms in shades of white, pink, and purple from May to August and prefers full sun.

Candytuft plants have long, linear leaves that are arranged in opposite pairs along the stem. The flowers are small and clustered together in dense heads.

The plant grows 12-24 inches tall and does best in well-drained soil. It's a good choice for rock gardens, edging gardens, and cottage gardens.

Seedlings should be started indoors four to six weeks before the last frost date. Transplant seedlings into the garden after all danger of frost has passed. Plants can also be direct-seeded into the garden in early spring.

14. Eastern Red Columbine

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This North American wildflower blooms in shades of red, yellow, and orange from May to July. It prefers full sun to partial shade and is a good choice for woodland gardens and naturalized areas.

Eastern red columbine has long, divided leaves that are arranged in opposite pairs along the stem. The flowers are small and cup-shaped with five petals that are arranged in a spiral pattern.

The plant grows 18-24 inches tall and does best in well-drained soil.

Seedlings should be started indoors six to eight weeks before the last frost date. Transplant seedlings into the garden after all danger of frost has passed. Plants can also be direct-seeded into the garden in late spring or early summer.

15. Liatris

Courtesy of Adobe Stock

This North American wildflower blooms in shades of pink, purple, and white from July to September. It prefers full sun and is a good choice for cutting gardens, butterfly gardens, and naturalized areas.

Liatris plants have long, linear leaves that are arranged in opposite pairs along the stem. The flowers are small and clustered together in dense spikes.

The plant grows 24-36 inches tall and does best in well-drained soil.

Seedlings should be started indoors six to eight weeks before the last frost date. Transplant seedlings into the garden after all danger of frost has passed. Plants can also be direct-seeded into the garden in late spring or early summer.

Time to Start Planting

Wildflowers are a great way to add color and interest to your garden. There are many different varieties of wildflowers, so you're sure to find the perfect ones for your garden. These are just a few of the many wildflowers that you can add to your summer garden.

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Claire started Femme on FIRE after struggling with the debt cycle and realizing that she had to create better habits to get out of it. She became inspired along this journey and now strives to help others achieve financial freedom as well. When she isn’t working on her blog, you can find her on the couch with a good book, cooking up recipes in the kitchen, or playing outside with her ducks.